The Story of Doo-Wop

During the early 1950s, quartets sung on street corners, in barbershops and churches in a style which became known as Doo-Wop, paving the way for rock ‘n’ roll. As the groups moved from the streets into recording studios, so the popularity of the genre grew.

The show explores the story of the vocal style of singing which emerged in the 1950s and paved the way for early rock, enjoying resurgences in several following decades.

During the early 1950s, quartets sung on street corners, in barbershops and churches. As this new “sound” began to grow in popularity and reach the attention of prominent radio disc jockeys, taking over the billboard charts, the groups moved from the streets into the recording studios and the rest, as they say, was history.


The Story of Doo-Wop is performed as a live “broadcast” from a radio studio and presented by the host for the evening, radio show disc jockey Chuck Anderson. The D.J. “spins the discs” of some of the biggest hits of the genre which will be performed live by The TestostaTones, a group who have sung for the Queen, Olly Murs and live on BBC Radio 2 as well as counting Jeremy Vine and ‘Professor of Pop’ and world music authority Paul Gambaccini among their fans who said of the group “How considerate of the TestostaTones to pay tribute to my local Bronx hero Dion. May they sing in harmony for years to come.”