• Pakefield Riding School - (c) Adrian Green

Pakefield guide

A coastal village with a fascinating maritime history

Sat atop a dramatic cliff and with a panoramic view out to the North Sea, Pakefield is a quaint suburb of Lowestoft with an identity that is all its own. Echoes of Pakefield’s maritime past are all around, from the little fishermen’s cottages to the diminutive 19th century lighthouse. Whether you visit for the day or stay for a long weekend your imagination will surely be captivated by this peaceful and understated historic coastal gem. 



Things to do in Pakefield

TTDA - Ferini Art Gallery - Upstairs gallery

1. Fossiling and beachwalking

Pakefield beach is pebbled and rustic, strewn with patches of Marram grass and the ideal place for a dog walk or a spot of kite flying on a windy day. You might even spot a seal on the shore. Budding geologists will be excited to know that Pakefield cliffs contain a wide selection of Jurassic fossils, and flint tools dating back 700,000 years, which were unearthed there by amateur archaeologists in 2006. You don’t need any specialist equipment to search for fossils yourself, just a keen eye, the right tides and a little luck! 

2. Dining Out

A visitor to Pakefield is spoiled for choice when it comes to eating and drinking. To get your fish and chip fix visit Pakefield Plaice, a modest and traditional shop serving freshly battered fish as well as all the chip shop extras you could want, including fritters, sausages, curry sauce and of course, ‘scraps’.  The Tramway Hotel, as the name suggests was once the southern terminus of the Lowestoft Tram service but now takes pride of place as home to the MarkG Seafood Restaurant . They have a delectable choice of menus including tapas style sharing plates and even a dedicated choice for vegan diners. 

One of The Suffolk Coast's newest boutique hotels, The Hog Hotel is not only the ideal place for a chic getaway by the sea, but it's home to a stylish restaurant with three exciting menus; TOASTED, the casual bar and conservatory dining menu offering 18 dishes available by the plate; TASTE of Britain, a classic British Sunday lunch inspired menu featuring traditional and heritage dishes from the region and around the UK; and the RESTAURANT (Thursday to Saturday evenings) offers a monthly changing A la Carte menu with six starters, six mains and six puddings, as well as signature sharing dishes including rib of beef for two or a huge fish to share.  A monthly TASTE supper club, featuring a chosen country with wines and cocktails to match will run from February onwards.

 Those seeking a light lunch and a more casual setting should certainly pay a visit to the adorable Tea by the Sea café and for friendly and atmospheric pubs serving local Adnams Ale try the The Trowel and Hammer which dates back to 1700 or The Oddfellows ,a favourite among locals who head there for the warm welcome and relaxed vibe. 

For stunning sea views and good food, The Jolly Sailor pub and restaurant serves both a bar and restaurant menu which includes burgers with exciting toppings, a great choice of seafood and traditional British fayre. At the weekends regulars pack the bar area to dance and sing along to the live music from talented local artists. 

3. Art and Culture. 

Visitors to Pakefield will notice an interesting glass building set back from the coast and at the heart of the village.  The Ferini Art Gallery is a creative hub for artists and collectors alike. The light and airy gallery houses work by over 20 artists and changes its exhibitions regularly. Wander around, take in the beautiful landscapes and abstract portraits and perhaps even take a souvenir away with you. 

Pakefield is home to the characterful and historic Seagull Theatre; a cherished building which, up until the end of WW2 was Morton Road School. It now has a cosy auditorium that seats 112 people and boasts a packed program that includes new writing, comedy, live music and a range of participatory events such as karaoke and quiz nights. 

4. Horse Riding

Budding equestrians will be thrilled to experience the dramatic coastline on horseback, riding along the sand with the waves crashing under-hoof. Pakefield Riding School has been taking riders for hacks along the beach for over 50 years and you can join them on a one-hour beach ride for £38.50. They have 25 experienced horses and cater for all riders from the complete beginner to the seasoned pro. 

Useful Information

Public Toilets and Baby Changing Facilities in Pakefield

Pakefield Street, Pakefield NR33 0JT

Useful Links

How to Get to Pakefield - Public Transport

By Bus: 

Frequent buses travel within the town from Lowestoft to Pakefield and there are regular services from Norwich and Ipswich.

Buses travel from Pakefield to Southwold and Beccles. Timetables can be found at https://www.suffolkonboard.com/

By Train:

The nearest railway station is Lowestoft with links to the national train network via Norwich and Ipswich. Ongoing services are provided by Greater Anglia to Ipswich and London Liverpool Street. All train tickets can be purchased via the Greater Anglia Website or the app available on Android, iPhone/iPad and Windows Phone.

By Car: 

From London and the South, take the A12 via Ipswich, or A11 via Norwich.

From Midlands and the North, take A14 via Cambridge, or A47 via Peterborough and Kings Lynn.

Car Parks in Pakefield

All Saints Road, NR33 0JN - 2 hours free parking.

Pakefield Street, NR33 0HS - £2 for 2 hours parking

Pakefield Road, NR33 0HS - £2 for hours parking.